HumanArts

October 2014
7 October 2014 - 6:30pm
AIA Lecture John J. Dobbins Architecture and Mosaics in the House of the Drinking Contest at Antioch: Reconstructing the Ancient Context

AIA Lecture John J. Dobbins Architecture and Mosaics in the House of the Drinking Contest at Antioch: Reconstructing the Ancient Context

7 October 2014 - 6:30pm
6:30 PM
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 

Antioch-on-the-Orontes was the capital of the Roman province of Syria and one of the most important cities in antiquity.  Among the treasures discovered by the 1930s excavations at Antioch and its vicinity are numerous polychrome floor mosaics.  This presentation focuses on reconstructing the original setting of the mosaics from the third-century CE House of the Drinking Contest at Seleucia Pieria, the port city of Antioch.  Mosaics from the house now are located in Worcester, Boston, Princeton, Richmond, Denver, St. Petersburg (FL), and Antakya (site of Antioch in Turkey). 

The separation of the mosaics has severed them from their original site and from each other.  Not even the original excavators saw the mosaics in their ancient context because the roofs of the house were gone as were the walls that supported the roofs and created windows, doors, and a courtyard that admitted light into the house.  Excavation photographs present the mosaics in place, but the lighting conditions were those of the 1930s.  The ancient occupants saw light enter over walls, through windows, and between columns as it moved across pavements during the course of the day and the arc of the year.  Neither excavation photographs nor museum environments recreate the ancient context.

Computer science addresses the problem of the lost architectural and lighting contexts through a 3D model created by Ethan Gruber that recreates the house and inserts the mosaics into the spaces that originally contained them.  A programming script calibrates the sunlight to the latitude and longitude of Seleucia Pieria and is set to the year 230 thus enabling an accurate lighting simulation for the house and its mosaics.  The computer model presents a graphic rendering of the hypotheses underpinning the architectural reconstruction.  Lighting simulations present the lighting conditions at the summer and winter solstices of the year 230.  Time-lapse videos allow the viewer to observe and study the movement of light throughout the house on those days.  Finally, the model places the viewer within the ancient spaces, thereby reconstructing and recontextualizing view corridors within the house and from the house to the natural environment.


Hagan Hall

Antioch-on-the-Orontes was the capital of the Roman province of Syria and one of the most important cities in antiquity.  Among the treasures discovered by the 1930s excavations at Antioch and its vicinity are numerous polychrome floor mosaics.  This presentation focuses on reconstructing the original setting of the mosaics from the third-century CE House of the Drinking Contest at Seleucia Pieria, the port city of Antioch.  Mosaics from the house now are located in Worcester, Boston, Princeton, Richmond, Denver, St. Petersburg (FL), and Antakya (site of Antioch in Turkey). 

The separation of the mosaics has severed them from their original site and from each other.  Not even the original excavators saw the mosaics in their ancient context because the roofs of the house were gone as were the walls that supported the roofs and created windows, doors, and a courtyard that admitted light into the house.  Excavation photographs present the mosaics in place, but the lighting conditions were those of the 1930s.  The ancient occupants saw light enter over walls, through windows, and between columns as it moved across pavements during the course of the day and the arc of the year.  Neither excavation photographs nor museum environments recreate the ancient context.

Computer science addresses the problem of the lost architectural and lighting contexts through a 3D model created by Ethan Gruber that recreates the house and inserts the mosaics into the spaces that originally contained them.  A programming script calibrates the sunlight to the latitude and longitude of Seleucia Pieria and is set to the year 230 thus enabling an accurate lighting simulation for the house and its mosaics.  The computer model presents a graphic rendering of the hypotheses underpinning the architectural reconstruction.  Lighting simulations present the lighting conditions at the summer and winter solstices of the year 230.  Time-lapse videos allow the viewer to observe and study the movement of light throughout the house on those days.  Finally, the model places the viewer within the ancient spaces, thereby reconstructing and recontextualizing view corridors within the house and from the house to the natural environment.

27 October 2014 - 7:30pm
Civil War Era Music

Civil War Era Music

27 October 2014 - 7:30pm
7:30 PM
Type of Event: 

This concert is a concert/lecture performance of music from the Civil War era of the United States played by an ensemble comprised of a Brass Quintet, Percussion, Piano and Vocalist. The pianist, Allan Mueller, has researched and arranged all the music for this performance. As well as the performance of these pieces, there will be a description of each piece focusing on its historical relevancy.     The ensemble will also feature two musicians with direct connection to Assumption College. The vocalist will be tenor Ray Bawens, '82 and Bruce Hopkins, the Band Director of the Assumption College Band.


Chapel of the Holy Spirit

This concert is a concert/lecture performance of music from the Civil War era of the United States played by an ensemble comprised of a Brass Quintet, Percussion, Piano and Vocalist. The pianist, Allan Mueller, has researched and arranged all the music for this performance. As well as the performance of these pieces, there will be a description of each piece focusing on its historical relevancy.     The ensemble will also feature two musicians with direct connection to Assumption College. The vocalist will be tenor Ray Bawens, '82 and Bruce Hopkins, the Band Director of the Assumption College Band.

November 2014
1 November 2014 - 7:00pm
Gamelan Galak Tika

Gamelan Galak Tika

1 November 2014 - 7:00pm
7:00 PM
Type of Event: 
Event Venue: 

Gamelan Galak Tika will perform a combination of traditional and modern repertoire for gamelan gong kebyar written by both American and Balinese composers. Galak Tika will devote part of the performance to breaking down and analyzing a section of music to help audience members hear the varied musical layers across the ensemble. There will also be time for students to learn a short segment of music and try out the instruments.


Hagan Hall

Gamelan Galak Tika will perform a combination of traditional and modern repertoire for gamelan gong kebyar written by both American and Balinese composers. Galak Tika will devote part of the performance to breaking down and analyzing a section of music to help audience members hear the varied musical layers across the ensemble. There will also be time for students to learn a short segment of music and try out the instruments.

9 November 2014 - 2:00pm
Voice recital by Julianne Gearhart, Soprano

Voice recital by Julianne Gearhart, Soprano

9 November 2014 - 2:00pm
2:00 PM
Type of Event: 

Reception to follow in the Tinsley Community Room.

Click Here to Read Julianne's Biography

Click Here to Visit Julianne's Website


Chapel of the Holy Spirit

Reception to follow in the Tinsley Community Room.

Click Here to Read Julianne's Biography

Click Here to Visit Julianne's Website

March 2015
26 March 2015 - 7:00pm
John Hale - Cleopatra: An Archaeological Perspective on Egypt’s Last Pharaoh

John Hale - Cleopatra: An Archaeological Perspective on Egypt’s Last Pharaoh

26 March 2015 - 7:00pm
Type of Event: 

Reception will be held at 6:30pm

The Lecture will begin at 7:00pm

Cleopatra, last pharaoh of Egypt, may be the most famous female ruler in all of history.  But her Roman enemies made her notorious for all the wrong reasons: her political ambitions, her sumptuous lifestyle, and above all her love affairs with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.  Yet if we look past the long-standing stereotypes of popular culture, from Plutarch and Shakespeare to Elizabeth Taylor and Hollywood, the archaeological evidence paints a very different picture.  In this illustrated lecture, we will tour the Egypt that Cleopatra inherited from her Ptolemaic ancestors, view her self-chosen portraits on coins and temple walls, and take in her extraordinary achievements as goddess, priestess, queen, civil administrator, scholar, lover, and above all, mother.  Our journeys will follow Cleopatra from the Nile to the Tiber, and from desert shrines to the streets and palaces of her capital at Alexandria, now sunken beneath the waters of Alexandria harbor.  Archaeological discoveries create a truer picture of Cleopatra than the many literary and dramatic fantasies that have distorted the memory of this great leader.


Kennedy Memorial Hall - Room 112

Reception will be held at 6:30pm

The Lecture will begin at 7:00pm

Cleopatra, last pharaoh of Egypt, may be the most famous female ruler in all of history.  But her Roman enemies made her notorious for all the wrong reasons: her political ambitions, her sumptuous lifestyle, and above all her love affairs with Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.  Yet if we look past the long-standing stereotypes of popular culture, from Plutarch and Shakespeare to Elizabeth Taylor and Hollywood, the archaeological evidence paints a very different picture.  In this illustrated lecture, we will tour the Egypt that Cleopatra inherited from her Ptolemaic ancestors, view her self-chosen portraits on coins and temple walls, and take in her extraordinary achievements as goddess, priestess, queen, civil administrator, scholar, lover, and above all, mother.  Our journeys will follow Cleopatra from the Nile to the Tiber, and from desert shrines to the streets and palaces of her capital at Alexandria, now sunken beneath the waters of Alexandria harbor.  Archaeological discoveries create a truer picture of Cleopatra than the many literary and dramatic fantasies that have distorted the memory of this great leader.